Publications

Small cell-like glandular proliferation of prostate: A rare lesion not related to small cell prostate cancer

Virchows Arch. 2017 Jan;470(1):47-54

Kryvenko ON, Williamson SR, Trpkov K, Gupta NS, Athanazio D, Selig MK, Smith PT, Magi-Galluzzi C, Jorda M

Abstract

Small cell-like change (SCLC) is a rare prostate lesion which has been described in only two previous studies (total of eight cases). Its relation to possible neuroendocrine differentiation remained unclear. We evaluated 11 SCLC cases with immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. SCLC was characterized by crowded hyperchromatic small nuclei with scant cytoplasm, rosette-like structures, finely granular chromatin with indistinct nucleoli, and lack of mitoses, apoptoses, and necroses. In nine cases, SCLC was admixed with high-grade cancer, and in two cases, it represented a separate intraductal process, spatially remote from a low-volume Gleason score 6 (grade group 1) cancer. Only 2/11 SCLC labeled for synaptophysin, chromogranin, and serotonin, although 6/11 were at least focally positive for TTF1. Staining for NKX3.1 and pancytokeratin was typically weak, focal, and markedly reduced compared to the adjacent cancer. SCLC was positive for ERG in 1/8 and for racemase in 6/10 cases, again typically in a focal and weak fashion. There was no immunoreactivity with CD56, p63, or HMWCK. Ki-67 highlighted only rare nuclei (<1 %). No neuroendocrine granules were demonstrated by electron microscopy in four cases that showed no immunoreactivity for neuroendocrine markers. In summary, SCLC is more frequently found in high-grade prostate cancer, but it may also be encountered as a noninvasive lesion in Gleason score 6 (grade group 1) cancer. Importantly, it does not appear to indicate neuroendocrine differentiation. The low-grade cytology, the lack of mitoses and apoptoses, and the minimal Ki-67 reactivity are findings to support its discrimination from a small cell carcinoma.

PubMed

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The Calgary Prostate Cancer Centre has the highest accrual for a novel ultrasound study in prostate cancer

“We have enrolled over 400 patients at our site, reaching our enrollment goal much faster than all other sites across North America. We are now planning on adding in 250 more patients to this trial because of the encouraging results found with the first arm of the trial. Our site tied with the highest accrual goal and surpassed all other sites to meet our enrollment goal.”

The study is a “Multi-Center trial of high-resolution transrectal ultrasound versus standard low-resolution transrectal ultrasound for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer”

The only definitive method for diagnosing prostate cancer is through a prostate biopsy. This procedure includes the use of an ultrasound machine to guide both freezing needles and biopsy needles into the prostate. The ultrasound machine that is currently in use is a low-resolution ultrasound machine which means that although it is good at seeing the entire prostate gland to guide the needles, it is often unable to visualize the prostate in enough detail to be able to see different lesions and areas of concern within it. Thus, many biopsy samples are taken systematically with two samples from each section of the prostate. Recently a new ultrasound machine has been created that gives images of the prostate with much higher resolution, allowing the radiologist performing the biopsy to see details within the prostate that were previously inaccessible. A study using this new high-resolution ultrasound machine is being completed at the Prostate Cancer Centre to compare the adequacy of this new machine to detect prostate cancer over the standard low-resolution machine. Over 650 patients will be enrolled in this study!

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- Eric Hyndman