Get Involved

Get Involved

There are many ways to get involved with APCaRI. Join our team, support events in your community or donate to this important initiative.

  • Careers & Training

    APCaRI members are working on the many problems associated with prostate cancer. We need bold, innovative and curious people to be engaged and to focus their energies to solve these problems. We offer a variety of careers and training programs from volunteer to principal investigator to collaborator.
    View all current opportunities
  • Events

    APCaRI members are not just a group of stuffy scientists working in a laboratory. We take great pride being a part of community and fundraising events that help raise awareness about prostate cancer. From the Underwear Affair to the Motorcycle Ride for Dad to Movember Events, APCaRI members are there to talk with and ask questions.
    Upcoming events
  • Donate

    To make this all work, we need research dollars. Your kind donations help APCaRI to identify and test new biomarkers of prostate cancer, design and validate a new fluid biopsy test for prostate cancer diagnosis, purchase research tools and help train the next generation of scientists to carry forward the research ideas of today.
    Donate now

Other ways to help?

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer to affect Canadian men. One in seven men will be diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime. Here are more ways to help change those statistics.

Dr. Nawaid Usmani and team receive funding for their PRIME study!

The PRIME Study – Prevention and Intervention for MEtabolic syndrome:

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and newer manipulations of androgen receptor signaling have improved outcomes for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients.  The toxicities of ADT are many, including an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS; defined as at least 3 of: hyperglycemia; abdominal obesity; hypertriglyceridemia; reduced HDL cholesterol; and/or hypertension). MS is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease mortality, stroke mortality, and all-cause mortality.  The prevalence of MS in men receiving ADT is at least 50% and contributes to decreased quality of life and increased non-cancer-related mortality.  Metformin holds promise as a countermeasure to MS development, and also has been shown to suppress PCa growth in pre-clinical models.

We hypothesize that the addition of metformin to ADT will reduce the rates of MS in men with advanced PCa, diminishing important toxicities of a therapy universally used in advanced disease.

We propose a double-blind, randomized phase III study of metformin or placebo in men with PCa starting intermittent ADT. The primary endpoint is the difference in MS rates at 1 year.  Other aims include evaluation of the influence of metformin on: individual MS components at additional time points; mean serum insulin levels and measures of insulin resistance; weight and quality of life.

A finding that metformin reduces MS incidence and/or has other benefits would change practice, as it would provide a practical and inexpensive strategy to reduce toxicity of an intervention employed in most men with advanced PCa.

- Catalina Vasquez