Partners

Our International Network of Partners

Meeting our ambitious goals will not be possible without the committed engagement of our many partners across Alberta, Canada and the World. We are extremely grateful.

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Medical Institutions

Prostate Cancer Centre (Calgary)

Northern Alberta Urology Centre (Edmonton)

Alberta Health Services (Alberta)

Vancouver Prostate Cancer Centre (Vancouver)

The Prostate Centre at The Princess Margaret Hospital (Toronto)

CHUM Groupe de soutien du cancer de la prostate (Montreal)

London Regional Cancer Program (London, ON)

Technology Platforms

Malvern (UK)

APOGEE (UK)

Nanosight

BGI Genomics (China)

Precision Nanosystems (BC)

Universities

University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB)

University of Calgary (Calgary, AB)

Western University (London, ON)

Dalhousie University (Halifax, NS)

University of Toronto (Toronto, ON)

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN)

Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH)

Fraunhofer ITEM-R (Regensburg, Germany)

Biorepositories

Alberta Cancer Research Biobank (Calgary, Edmonton)

Australian Prostate Cancer BioResource (Australia: Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide)

OICR Tumour Bank (Ontario)

Tomorrow Project 

UHN GU BioBank

Canadian Biosample Repository

Canadian Prostate Cancer Biomarker Network

Financial Resources

Alberta Cancer Foundation (Alberta)

Movember Foundation (Australia, Canada)

Terry Fox Research Institute (Canada)

Motorcycle Ride for Dad (Canada)

Prostate Cancer Canada

Alberta Innovates Health Solutions – Collaborative Research and Innovation opportunities

Alberta Lymphedema Network (Edmonton, Alberta)

University Hospital Foundation – J & J Partnership

Support Groups

Prostate Cancer Canada Network (Canada)

Prostate Cancer Canada Network (Calgary)

Prostate Cancer Canada Network (Edmonton)

Dr. Nawaid Usmani and team receive funding for their PRIME study!

The PRIME Study – Prevention and Intervention for MEtabolic syndrome:

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and newer manipulations of androgen receptor signaling have improved outcomes for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients.  The toxicities of ADT are many, including an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS; defined as at least 3 of: hyperglycemia; abdominal obesity; hypertriglyceridemia; reduced HDL cholesterol; and/or hypertension). MS is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease mortality, stroke mortality, and all-cause mortality.  The prevalence of MS in men receiving ADT is at least 50% and contributes to decreased quality of life and increased non-cancer-related mortality.  Metformin holds promise as a countermeasure to MS development, and also has been shown to suppress PCa growth in pre-clinical models.

We hypothesize that the addition of metformin to ADT will reduce the rates of MS in men with advanced PCa, diminishing important toxicities of a therapy universally used in advanced disease.

We propose a double-blind, randomized phase III study of metformin or placebo in men with PCa starting intermittent ADT. The primary endpoint is the difference in MS rates at 1 year.  Other aims include evaluation of the influence of metformin on: individual MS components at additional time points; mean serum insulin levels and measures of insulin resistance; weight and quality of life.

A finding that metformin reduces MS incidence and/or has other benefits would change practice, as it would provide a practical and inexpensive strategy to reduce toxicity of an intervention employed in most men with advanced PCa.

- Catalina Vasquez