Publications

Adam Kinnaird, Wayne Brisbane, Lorna Kwan, Alan Priester, Ryan Chuang, Danielle E Barsa, Merdie Delfin, Anthony Sisk, Daniel Margolis, Ely Felker, Jim Hu, Leonard S Marks

A prostate cancer risk calculator (PCRC-MRI): Use of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data to predict biopsy outcome in North American men

Kinnaird- 02-13-2021-A-prostate-cancer-risk-calculator_CUAJ

PMID: 34672937

DOI: 10.5489/cuaj.7380

Abstract

Introduction: A functional tool to optimize patient selection for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate biopsy (MRGB) is an unmet clinical need. We sought to develop a prostate cancer risk calculator (PCRC-MRI) that combines MRI and clinical characteristics to aid decision-making for MRGB in North American men.

Methods: Two prospective registries containing 2354 consecutive men undergoing MRGB (September 2009 to April 2019) were analyzed. Patients were randomized into five groups, with one group randomly assigned to be the validation cohort against the other four groups as the discovery cohort. The primary outcome was detection of clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) defined as Gleason grade group ≥2. Variables included age, ethnicity, digital rectal exam (DRE), prior biopsy, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostate volume, PSA density, and MRI score. Odds ratios were calculated from multivariate logistic regression comparing two models: one with clinical variables only (clinical) against a second combining clinical variables with MRI data (clinical+MRI).

Results: csPCa was present in 942 (40%) of the 2354 men available for study. The positive and negative predictive values for csPCa in the clinical+MRI model were 57% and 89%, respectively. The area under the curve of the clinical+MRI model was superior to the clinical model in discovery (0.843 vs. 0.707, p<0.0001) and validation (0.888 vs. 0.757, p<0.0001) cohorts. Use of PCRC-MRI would have avoided approximately 16 unnecessary biopsies in every 100 men. Of all variables examined, Asian ethnicity was the most protective factor (odds ratio [OR] 0.46 [0.29-0.75]) while MRI score 5 indicated greatest risk (OR15.8 [10.5-23.9]).

Conclusions: A risk calculator (PCRC-MRI), based on a large North American cohort, is shown to improve patient selection for MRGB, especially in preventing unnecessary biopsies. This tool is available at https://www.uclahealth.org/urology/prostate-cancer-risk-calculator and may help rationalize biopsy decision-making.

14th Annual APCaRI Fall Symposium 2022

We’re meeting in person at the Banff Park Lodge (location and directions). This year the symposium features three invited speakers:
Agenda_APCaRI Fall Symposium 2022

Dr. Chris Wallis, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor, University of Toronto and Urologic Oncologist, Mount Sinai Hospital and University Health Network

KEYNOTE on FRIDAY, NOV 18, 3-3:50 pm: “But what if….? Treatment regret in localized prostate cancer”

Christopher Wallis obtained his Doctor of Medicine from the University of British Columbia and his Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Epidemiology & Health Care Research from the Institute of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He completed his clinical residency in Urology at the University of Toronto affiliated hospitals and his Society of Urologic Oncology accredited fellowship training at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. To date, he has more than 225 publications in peer-reviewed journals. His research focuses on leveraging epidemiologic techniques to understand the interaction between processes of care and patient outcomes, with a particular focus on patients with cancer and those undergoing surgery.

Dr. Paul Boutros, PhD
Professor, Human Genetics, Department of Urology, University of California, Los Angeles

KEYNOTE on SATURDAY, NOV 19, 9:10-10 am: “The evolution of lethal prostate cancer”

My primary research focus is developing large clinically-coherent cancer cohorts, linked to high-dimensional molecular or imaging data. We develop statistical and machine-learning algorithms to identify novel features and create biomarkers that predict actionable clinical phenotypes. This leads to deep long-term collaborations with clinicians and clinician-scientists, working regularly on clinical trial cohorts to ensure our work has a potential patient impact. I am passionate about ensuring that the data and software resources we create reach wide community usage, and this has led to the second major focus of my research.

Mr. Vijay Pandurangan, Prof. MSc.
Adjunct Professor at Stanford School of Medicine.

KEYNOTE on SATURDAY, NOV 19, 1:30-2:20 pm: “How better software engineering improves scientific and medical research.”

Vijay received his Bachelor’s in Computer Engineering from George Washington and his MSc in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon. Following his MSc, Vijay joined Google as one of the company’s earliest software engineers in 2002. He later founded a venture-backed company called Mitro, which focused on building an easy way for teams to save and share passwords, which was acquired by Twitter – where Vijay led the New York engineering team. Following his time at Google and Twitter, Vijay joined Benchmark as an Entrepreneur in Residence. Throughout his 20 years of experience in building software, Vijay has been an avid investor in early-stage startups. His portfolio spans 90+ companies, primarily in the B2B and biotech space, including Wish, Pilot, FabricNano, BigHat Biosciences, and Deel. While working to improve software practices in a cancer immunotherapy startup, Vijay discovered that while the amount of software written by scientists and researchers has inexorably increased, few are aware of best engineering practices, resulting in longer iteration times, more scientific errors and barriers to reproducibility. To bridge this gap, Vijay teaches and advises students and researchers on software engineering techniques to help scientists make their research more rigorous and reproducible, focusing on cloud computing, source control, version management, data storage, and collaboration techniques.

The APCaRI Fall Symposium is always an enriching and fun event! Attendees include clinicians, scientists, clinical research personnel, trainees, benefactors, and representatives of prostate cancer support groups.

THANK YOU TO THE APCARI FALL SYMPOSIUM 2022 SPONSORS AND FUNDING AGENCIES

 

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