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Sedentary Behavior and Prostate Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

By:
Contributors: Karen A. Kopciuk, PhD
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 May;23(5):882-9. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0808. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Abstract

Sedentary behavior (sitting time) has been proposed as an independent risk factor for some cancers; however, its role in the development of prostate cancer has not been determined. We examined the prospective associations of self-reported daily sitting time and daily television/video viewing time with the risk of developing or dying from prostate cancer among 170,481 men in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We estimated HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Between 1996 and 2006, there were 13,751 incident (including 1,365 advanced) prostate cancer cases identified; prostate cancer mortality (through 2008) was 669. No strong or significant association with prostate cancer risk was seen in fully adjusted models for either daily sitting or television/video time. There were some suggestions of effect modification by body mass index (BMI; interaction for television/video time and BMI, P = 0.02). For total prostate cancer risk, television/video time was associated with a slightly elevated, but nonsignificant, increase amongst obese men (HR = 1.28; 95% CI, 0.98-1.69); a null association was observed amongst overweight men (HR = 1.04; 0.89-1.22); and, for men with a normal BMI, television/video time was associated with a nonsignificant risk decrease (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.66-1.01). Similar patterns were observed for total daily sitting and television/video time in advanced prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality. Sedentary behavior seems to play a limited role in the development of prostate cancer; however, we cannot rule out potential effect modification by BMI or the impact of measurement error on results.

PubMed

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Working to include Yukoners in APCaRI

APCaRI, represented by John Lewis and Catalina Vasquez, met with many Yukoners in Whitehorse recently to discuss the potential of including the North of 60 men in the registry and their samples in the biorepository. Sean Secord (photographed with John and Catalina), formerly with the Yukon Hospitals Foundation, talked with John on CBC Whitehorse radio about the challenges that Yukoners with cancer, and their families, have to manage and overcome to get testing and treatment. They are formidable; a recent article by Simkin et al., 2017 evaluated cancer mortality rates in the Yukon from 1999 to 2013 and found that they were elevated for prostate, female breast and lung, and colorectal cancers compared to both urban and rural populations in Canada South of the Yukon. The authors suggested that the high Yukon rates are, in part, due to the high percentage of Yukoners living in rural and very remote communities, making it necessary for patients to have to travel long distances for diagnoses and treatment. But even if the cancer patient lives in Whitehorse, (Yukon capital, population 25 085), cancer care options are limited due in part to a lack of oncologists and the specialized equipment needed.
John and Catalina met and had stimulating discussions with many people dedicated to improving cancer care in the North including the Yukon Ride for Dad organizers, representatives from the medical and laboratory communities and people living with cancer, and their families.
APCaRI is determined to find a way to include the Yukon men in the registry so that their valuable medical information and samples can be added to the prostate cancer research initiative and be an important part of improving prostate cancer diagnosis, treatment and care.

- Perrin Beatty