Publications

Publications

Mentors and the butterfly effect: triggers for discovering signalling by proteinases via proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) and more.

By:
Contributors: Morley Hollenberg Research Group
Clin Invest Med. 2012 Feb 1;35(6):E378-91.

Abstract

The essential role of proteinases as regulatory digestive enzymes, recognized since the late 1800s, has been underscored by the discovery that more than 2% of the genome codes for proteinases and their inhibitors. Further, by the early 1970s it was appreciated that in addition to their digestive actions, proteinases can affect cell function: (1) by the generation or degradation of peptide hormones and (2) by the direct regulation of signalling by receptors like the one for insulin. It was the discovery in the 1990s of the novel G-protein-coupled ‘proteinase-activated receptor’ (PAR) family that has caused a paradigm shift in the understanding of the way that proteinases can regulate cell signalling. This overview provides a perspective for the discovery of the PARs and my laboratory’s role in (1) understanding the molecular pharmacology of these fascinating receptors and (2) identifying the potential pathophysiological roles that the PAR family can play in inflammatory disease. In this context, the overview also portrays the essential impact that seemingly minor comments/insights provided by my lifelong mentors have had on kindling my intense interest in proteinase-mediated signalling. The ‘butterfly effect‘ of those comments has led to an unexpectedly large impact on my own research directions. Hopefully my own ‘butterfly comments’ will also be heard by my trainees and other colleagues with whom I am currently working and will promote future discoveries that will be directly relevant to the treatment of inflammatory disease.

 

PubMed

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Russ Greiner’s Team “PC LEARN”, tied for 1st in the Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge

Competing with 50 teams from around the world in the Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge, University of Alberta’s PC LEARN team tied for 1st in one of the 3 sub-challenges
to predict the survival and toxicity of Docetaxel treatment in patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer!

“The DREAM Challenge was an exciting opportunity for us to apply machine learning to real medical data and possibly to contribute to medical research.” said lead PI and APCaRI member Russ Greiner.

The primary benefit of this Challenge will be to establish new quantitative benchmarks for prognostic modeling in mCRPC, with a potential impact for clinical decision making and ultimately understanding the mechanism of disease progression. https://www.synapse.org/#!Synapse:syn2813558/wiki/70844

- Russ Greiner