Publications

Publications

Integrin-Free Tetraspanin CD151 Can Inhibit Tumor Cell Motility upon Clustering and Is a Clinical Indicator of Prostate Cancer Progression

By:
Contributors: John D. Lewis Research Group

Cancer Res. 2014 Jan 1;74(1):173-87. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-0275. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

Palmer TD1, Martínez CH, Vasquez C, Hebron KE, Jones-Paris C, Arnold SA, Chan SM, Chalasani V, Gomez-Lemus JA, Williams AK, Chin JL, Giannico GA, Ketova T, Lewis JD, Zijlstra A.

Abstract

Normal physiology relies on the organization of transmembrane proteins by molecular scaffolds, such as tetraspanins. Oncogenesis frequently involves changes in their organization or expression. The tetraspanin CD151 is thought to contribute to cancer progression through direct interaction with the laminin-binding integrins α3β1 and α6β1. However, this interaction cannot explain the ability of CD151 to control migration in the absence of these integrins or on non-laminin substrates. We demonstrate that CD151 can regulate tumor cell migration without direct integrin binding and that integrin-free CD151 (CD151(free)) correlates clinically with tumor progression and metastasis. Clustering CD151(free) through its integrin-binding domain promotes accumulation in areas of cell-cell contact, leading to enhanced adhesion and inhibition of tumor cell motility in vitro and in vivo. CD151(free) clustering is a strong regulator of motility even in the absence of α3 expression but requires PKCα, suggesting that CD151 can control migration independent of its integrin associations. The histologic detection of CD151(free) in prostate cancer correlates with poor patient outcome. When CD151(free) is present, patients are more likely to recur after radical prostatectomy and progression to metastatic disease is accelerated. Multivariable analysis identifies CD151(free) as an independent predictor of survival. Moreover, the detection of CD151(free) can stratify survival among patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen levels. Cumulatively, these studies demonstrate that a subpopulation of CD151 exists on the surface of tumor cells that can regulate migration independent of its integrin partner. The clinical correlation of CD151(free) with prostate cancer progression suggests that it may contribute to the disease and predict cancer progression.

PubMed

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Congratulations to top alumni honour awardee Dr. Ron Moore

Congratulations to Dr. Ron Moore, ’80 BSc, ’86 MD, ’91 PhD, who will receive an Alumni Honour Award from University of Alberta President David H. Turpin during the Alumni Awards Ceremony on Monday, Sept. 24, 2018, at the Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium in Edmonton.
The Alumni Honour Award recognizes the significant achievements and contributions by University of Alberta alumni to their profession and their community. Dr. Moore has made significant contributions to advancing our knowledge and treatment of bladder, kidney and prostate cancer. He has studied and developed laser treatment as therapy for prostate and bladder cancer, and developed new drugs to improve prostate cancer radiotherapy outcomes. Dr. Ron Moore has also actively mentored and trained hundreds of students throughout his career as well as serving on the APCaRI leadership committee.

The community is invited to celebrate as Dr. Ron Moore receives this top alumni award!
Date: Monday, Sept. 24, 2018
Location: Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium (11455 87 Ave), Edmonton, Alberta
Time: 7 p.m. ceremony with dessert reception to follow
Cost: Free, register for tickets
Dress: Business attire

For more information, please contact the Office of Alumni Relations at 780-492-3224, toll free 1-800-661-2593 or alumni@ualberta.ca
Featured at @UAlbertaAlumni and in the New Trail magazine.

- Perrin Beatty