Publications

Publications

ERG protein expression and gene rearrangements are present at lower rates in metastatic and locally advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer compared to localized disease.

By:
Contributors: Bryan Donnelly, MD, MSc, FRCSC, Kiril Trpkov, MD, FRCPC, Tarek Bismar Research Group
Urology. 2013 Aug;82(2):394-9. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2013.03.029. Epub 2013 Jun 6.

Abstract

 

OBJECTIVE:

To compare ERG expression and gene rearrangements rates in metastatic and castrationresistant prostate cancer (CRPC) to localized disease as ERG is the most common genetic event in early prostate cancer (PCa) with potential prognostic and therapeutic implications.

METHODS:

We evaluated ERG protein expression in 344 patients with PCa in 3 cohorts including localized, metastatic, and castrationresistant disease using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

RESULTS:

ERG protein expression was detected exclusively in the neoplastic epithelium and was found in 6.8% and 46.3% of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and localized PCa, respectively. In metastatic and locally advanced CRPC, ERG expression was significantly lower, occurring at 36.1% and 37.2%, respectively. In PCa with foamy gland morphology, ERG protein expression was detected in only 18.6% compared with reported rates of about 42%-48% in acinar PCa. Moreover, ERG protein expression and gene rearrangements showed an overall consistency rate of 90.6% (P <.0001). The consistency rate was 100% both in benign glands and HGPIN, and 96.1% in localized PCa. However, it was significantly lower at 76.9% and 85% in node metastatic and CRPC, respectively (P <.0001).

CONCLUSION:

ERG protein expression is restricted to neoplastic prostatic epithelium and is present at lower rates in metastatic and CRPC compared to localized PCa. IHC and FISH concordance rates were significantly lower in node metastatic and CRPC compared to localized PCa, which may suggest different biological and therapeutic implications. The lower rate of ERG protein expression in foamy gland PCa may suggest potential differences for this pattern of PCa at the molecular level.

 

PubMed

Download PDF

Stay Informed

To stay up to date on all the latest news and publications, subscribe to our newsletter!

Working to include Yukoners in APCaRI

APCaRI, represented by John Lewis and Catalina Vasquez, met with many Yukoners in Whitehorse recently to discuss the potential of including the North of 60 men in the registry and their samples in the biorepository. Sean Secord (photographed with John and Catalina), formerly with the Yukon Hospitals Foundation, talked with John on CBC Whitehorse radio about the challenges that Yukoners with cancer, and their families, have to manage and overcome to get testing and treatment. They are formidable; a recent article by Simkin et al., 2017 evaluated cancer mortality rates in the Yukon from 1999 to 2013 and found that they were elevated for prostate, female breast and lung, and colorectal cancers compared to both urban and rural populations in Canada South of the Yukon. The authors suggested that the high Yukon rates are, in part, due to the high percentage of Yukoners living in rural and very remote communities, making it necessary for patients to have to travel long distances for diagnoses and treatment. But even if the cancer patient lives in Whitehorse, (Yukon capital, population 25 085), cancer care options are limited due in part to a lack of oncologists and the specialized equipment needed.
John and Catalina met and had stimulating discussions with many people dedicated to improving cancer care in the North including the Yukon Ride for Dad organizers, representatives from the medical and laboratory communities and people living with cancer, and their families.
APCaRI is determined to find a way to include the Yukon men in the registry so that their valuable medical information and samples can be added to the prostate cancer research initiative and be an important part of improving prostate cancer diagnosis, treatment and care.

- Perrin Beatty