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Distinguishing prostate-specific antigen bounces from biochemical failure after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

By:
Contributors: Nawaid Usmani, MD, FRCPC, Sunita Ghosh, PhD
J Contemp Brachytherapy. 2014 Oct;6(3):247-53. doi: 10.5114/jcb.2014.45093. Epub 2014 Sep 5.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to characterize benign prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces of at least 2.0 ng/mL and biochemical failure as defined by the Phoenix definition after prostate brachytherapy at our institution, and to investigate distinguishing features between three outcome groups: patients experiencing a benign PSA bounce, biochemical failure, or neither.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Five hundred and thirty consecutive men treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy with follow-up of at least 3 years were divided into outcome groups experiencing bounce, failure, or neither. A benign bounce was defined as a rise of at least 2.0 ng/mL over the pre-rise nadir followed by a decline to 0.5 ng/mL or below, without intervention. Patient and tumor characteristics, treatment variables, and PSA kinetics were analyzed between groups.

RESULTS:

Thirty-two (6.0%) men experienced benign bounces and 47 (8.9%) men experienced failure. Men experiencing a bounce were younger (p = 0.01), had a higher 6-month PSA level (p = 0.03), and took longer to reach a final nadir (p < 0.01). Compared to the failure group, men with bounce had a lower pre-treatment PSA level (p = 0.01) and experienced a rise of at least 2.0 ng/mL that occurred sooner after the implant (p < 0.01) with a faster PSA doubling time (p = 0.01). Only time to PSA rise independently differentiated between bounce and failure (p < 0.01), with a benign bounce not being seen after 36 months post-treatment. Prostate-specific antigen levels during a bounce reached levels as high as 12.6 ng/mL in this cohort, and in some cases took over 5 years to decline to below 0.5 ng/mL.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although there is substantial overlap between the features of benign PSA bounces and failure, physicians may find it useful to evaluate the timing, absolute PSA level, initial response to treatment, and rate of rise when contemplating management for a PSA rise after low-dose-rate brachytherapy.

PubMed

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Our First Participant!

Thanks to the participation from men with suspected prostate cancer and men diagnosed with prostate cancer, we will be able to measure if our “tests” can reveal the true nature of prostate cancer and if the tests or biomarkers can diagnose prostate cancer and tell us what cancers are more aggressive.

As part of the Alberta Prostate Registry and Biorepository, patients will be entered into our study, in which blood and other samples are collected over time and their health outcomes are recorded over many years. Patients will follow standard medical advice and care through their doctors. Our team collect biospecimens and information related to general health and cancer behavior over time.

Rather than being frightened by the word ‘cancer’, we want to learn how to predict serious and morbid prostate cancer complications well before they happen, so that we can weigh carefully the pros and cons of available treatments.

In the process, we expect to identify new and important advantage points for better therapies to be developed. The word “cancer” may be scary, but what is truly scary is unawareness.

“It makes me very happy to be able to contribute to find better ways to diagnose prostate cancer.”

- Mr. Garcia