Publications

Publications

Tumor vascular responses to antivascular and antiangiogenic strategies: looking for suitable models

By:
Contributors: Jihane Mriouah, PhD
Trends Biotechnol. 2012 Dec;30(12):649-58. doi: 10.1016/j.tibtech.2012.08.006. Epub 2012 Sep 26.

Abstract

Antiangiogenic and vascular disrupting agents are in the current cancer therapeutic armamentarium. A better understanding of the intricate mechanisms ruling neovessel survival within tumors during or after treatment is needed. Refinement of imaging and a growing knowledge of molecular biology of tumor vascularization provide new insights. It is necessary to define suitable methods for monitoring tumor response and appropriate tools to analyze data. This review compares most commonly used preclinical models, considering their recent improvements, and describes promising new approaches such as microfluidics, real-time electrical impedance based technique and noninvasive imaging techniques. The advantages and limitations of the in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models are discussed. This review also provides a critical summary of emerging approaches using mathematical modeling.

 PubMed

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The Calgary Prostate Cancer Centre has the highest accrual for a novel ultrasound study in prostate cancer

“We have enrolled over 400 patients at our site, reaching our enrollment goal much faster than all other sites across North America. We are now planning on adding in 250 more patients to this trial because of the encouraging results found with the first arm of the trial. Our site tied with the highest accrual goal and surpassed all other sites to meet our enrollment goal.”

The study is a “Multi-Center trial of high-resolution transrectal ultrasound versus standard low-resolution transrectal ultrasound for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer”

The only definitive method for diagnosing prostate cancer is through a prostate biopsy. This procedure includes the use of an ultrasound machine to guide both freezing needles and biopsy needles into the prostate. The ultrasound machine that is currently in use is a low-resolution ultrasound machine which means that although it is good at seeing the entire prostate gland to guide the needles, it is often unable to visualize the prostate in enough detail to be able to see different lesions and areas of concern within it. Thus, many biopsy samples are taken systematically with two samples from each section of the prostate. Recently a new ultrasound machine has been created that gives images of the prostate with much higher resolution, allowing the radiologist performing the biopsy to see details within the prostate that were previously inaccessible. A study using this new high-resolution ultrasound machine is being completed at the Prostate Cancer Centre to compare the adequacy of this new machine to detect prostate cancer over the standard low-resolution machine. Over 650 patients will be enrolled in this study!

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- Eric Hyndman

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