Publications

Publications

Tumor vascular responses to antivascular and antiangiogenic strategies: looking for suitable models

By:
Contributors: Jihane Mriouah, PhD
Trends Biotechnol. 2012 Dec;30(12):649-58. doi: 10.1016/j.tibtech.2012.08.006. Epub 2012 Sep 26.

Abstract

Antiangiogenic and vascular disrupting agents are in the current cancer therapeutic armamentarium. A better understanding of the intricate mechanisms ruling neovessel survival within tumors during or after treatment is needed. Refinement of imaging and a growing knowledge of molecular biology of tumor vascularization provide new insights. It is necessary to define suitable methods for monitoring tumor response and appropriate tools to analyze data. This review compares most commonly used preclinical models, considering their recent improvements, and describes promising new approaches such as microfluidics, real-time electrical impedance based technique and noninvasive imaging techniques. The advantages and limitations of the in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models are discussed. This review also provides a critical summary of emerging approaches using mathematical modeling.

 PubMed

Download PDF

Stay Informed

To stay up to date on all the latest news and publications, subscribe to our newsletter!

Dr. Nawaid Usmani and team receive funding for their PRIME study!

The PRIME Study – Prevention and Intervention for MEtabolic syndrome:

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and newer manipulations of androgen receptor signaling have improved outcomes for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients.  The toxicities of ADT are many, including an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS; defined as at least 3 of: hyperglycemia; abdominal obesity; hypertriglyceridemia; reduced HDL cholesterol; and/or hypertension). MS is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease mortality, stroke mortality, and all-cause mortality.  The prevalence of MS in men receiving ADT is at least 50% and contributes to decreased quality of life and increased non-cancer-related mortality.  Metformin holds promise as a countermeasure to MS development, and also has been shown to suppress PCa growth in pre-clinical models.

We hypothesize that the addition of metformin to ADT will reduce the rates of MS in men with advanced PCa, diminishing important toxicities of a therapy universally used in advanced disease.

We propose a double-blind, randomized phase III study of metformin or placebo in men with PCa starting intermittent ADT. The primary endpoint is the difference in MS rates at 1 year.  Other aims include evaluation of the influence of metformin on: individual MS components at additional time points; mean serum insulin levels and measures of insulin resistance; weight and quality of life.

A finding that metformin reduces MS incidence and/or has other benefits would change practice, as it would provide a practical and inexpensive strategy to reduce toxicity of an intervention employed in most men with advanced PCa.

- Catalina Vasquez

Our International Network of Partners

Meeting these ambitious goals will not be possible without the committed engagement of our many partners across Alberta, Canada and the World. Learn more about our Partners.