Publications

Publications

Sedentary Behavior and Prostate Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

By:
Contributors: Karen A. Kopciuk, PhD
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 May;23(5):882-9. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0808. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Abstract

Sedentary behavior (sitting time) has been proposed as an independent risk factor for some cancers; however, its role in the development of prostate cancer has not been determined. We examined the prospective associations of self-reported daily sitting time and daily television/video viewing time with the risk of developing or dying from prostate cancer among 170,481 men in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We estimated HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Between 1996 and 2006, there were 13,751 incident (including 1,365 advanced) prostate cancer cases identified; prostate cancer mortality (through 2008) was 669. No strong or significant association with prostate cancer risk was seen in fully adjusted models for either daily sitting or television/video time. There were some suggestions of effect modification by body mass index (BMI; interaction for television/video time and BMI, P = 0.02). For total prostate cancer risk, television/video time was associated with a slightly elevated, but nonsignificant, increase amongst obese men (HR = 1.28; 95% CI, 0.98-1.69); a null association was observed amongst overweight men (HR = 1.04; 0.89-1.22); and, for men with a normal BMI, television/video time was associated with a nonsignificant risk decrease (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.66-1.01). Similar patterns were observed for total daily sitting and television/video time in advanced prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality. Sedentary behavior seems to play a limited role in the development of prostate cancer; however, we cannot rule out potential effect modification by BMI or the impact of measurement error on results.

PubMed

Download PDF

Stay Informed

To stay up to date on all the latest news and publications, subscribe to our newsletter!

Russ Greiner’s Team “PC LEARN”, tied for 1st in the Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge

Competing with 50 teams from around the world in the Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge, University of Alberta’s PC LEARN team tied for 1st in one of the 3 sub-challenges
to predict the survival and toxicity of Docetaxel treatment in patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer!

“The DREAM Challenge was an exciting opportunity for us to apply machine learning to real medical data and possibly to contribute to medical research.” said lead PI and APCaRI member Russ Greiner.

The primary benefit of this Challenge will be to establish new quantitative benchmarks for prognostic modeling in mCRPC, with a potential impact for clinical decision making and ultimately understanding the mechanism of disease progression. https://www.synapse.org/#!Synapse:syn2813558/wiki/70844

- Russ Greiner