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Sedentary Behavior and Prostate Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

By:
Contributors: Karen A. Kopciuk, PhD
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 May;23(5):882-9. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0808. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Abstract

Sedentary behavior (sitting time) has been proposed as an independent risk factor for some cancers; however, its role in the development of prostate cancer has not been determined. We examined the prospective associations of self-reported daily sitting time and daily television/video viewing time with the risk of developing or dying from prostate cancer among 170,481 men in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We estimated HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Between 1996 and 2006, there were 13,751 incident (including 1,365 advanced) prostate cancer cases identified; prostate cancer mortality (through 2008) was 669. No strong or significant association with prostate cancer risk was seen in fully adjusted models for either daily sitting or television/video time. There were some suggestions of effect modification by body mass index (BMI; interaction for television/video time and BMI, P = 0.02). For total prostate cancer risk, television/video time was associated with a slightly elevated, but nonsignificant, increase amongst obese men (HR = 1.28; 95% CI, 0.98-1.69); a null association was observed amongst overweight men (HR = 1.04; 0.89-1.22); and, for men with a normal BMI, television/video time was associated with a nonsignificant risk decrease (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.66-1.01). Similar patterns were observed for total daily sitting and television/video time in advanced prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality. Sedentary behavior seems to play a limited role in the development of prostate cancer; however, we cannot rule out potential effect modification by BMI or the impact of measurement error on results.

PubMed

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The Bird Dogs: Pointing for the Prostate Cancer Cure

For years, Frank Sojonky hid his battle with prostate cancer from the world. But by 2004 he could hide it no longer, as the disease metastasized and began to spread. So when he learned from his oncologist, Dr. Peter Venner, that a chair in prostate cancer research was needed in Alberta, he made his personal goal to raise the funds to do it. That is how the Bird Dogs started and thanks to them and the Alberta Cancer Foundation, Dr. John Lewis and the Alberta Prostate Cancer Research Initiative are making important discoveries to improve the lives of those with prostate cancer.

Watch a video about the Bird Dogs.

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