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Publications

Integrin-Free Tetraspanin CD151 Can Inhibit Tumor Cell Motility upon Clustering and Is a Clinical Indicator of Prostate Cancer Progression

By:
Contributors: John D. Lewis Research Group

Cancer Res. 2014 Jan 1;74(1):173-87. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-0275. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

Palmer TD1, Martínez CH, Vasquez C, Hebron KE, Jones-Paris C, Arnold SA, Chan SM, Chalasani V, Gomez-Lemus JA, Williams AK, Chin JL, Giannico GA, Ketova T, Lewis JD, Zijlstra A.

Abstract

Normal physiology relies on the organization of transmembrane proteins by molecular scaffolds, such as tetraspanins. Oncogenesis frequently involves changes in their organization or expression. The tetraspanin CD151 is thought to contribute to cancer progression through direct interaction with the laminin-binding integrins α3β1 and α6β1. However, this interaction cannot explain the ability of CD151 to control migration in the absence of these integrins or on non-laminin substrates. We demonstrate that CD151 can regulate tumor cell migration without direct integrin binding and that integrin-free CD151 (CD151(free)) correlates clinically with tumor progression and metastasis. Clustering CD151(free) through its integrin-binding domain promotes accumulation in areas of cell-cell contact, leading to enhanced adhesion and inhibition of tumor cell motility in vitro and in vivo. CD151(free) clustering is a strong regulator of motility even in the absence of α3 expression but requires PKCα, suggesting that CD151 can control migration independent of its integrin associations. The histologic detection of CD151(free) in prostate cancer correlates with poor patient outcome. When CD151(free) is present, patients are more likely to recur after radical prostatectomy and progression to metastatic disease is accelerated. Multivariable analysis identifies CD151(free) as an independent predictor of survival. Moreover, the detection of CD151(free) can stratify survival among patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen levels. Cumulatively, these studies demonstrate that a subpopulation of CD151 exists on the surface of tumor cells that can regulate migration independent of its integrin partner. The clinical correlation of CD151(free) with prostate cancer progression suggests that it may contribute to the disease and predict cancer progression.

PubMed

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The Calgary Prostate Cancer Centre has the highest accrual for a novel ultrasound study in prostate cancer

“We have enrolled over 400 patients at our site, reaching our enrollment goal much faster than all other sites across North America. We are now planning on adding in 250 more patients to this trial because of the encouraging results found with the first arm of the trial. Our site tied with the highest accrual goal and surpassed all other sites to meet our enrollment goal.”

The study is a “Multi-Center trial of high-resolution transrectal ultrasound versus standard low-resolution transrectal ultrasound for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer”

The only definitive method for diagnosing prostate cancer is through a prostate biopsy. This procedure includes the use of an ultrasound machine to guide both freezing needles and biopsy needles into the prostate. The ultrasound machine that is currently in use is a low-resolution ultrasound machine which means that although it is good at seeing the entire prostate gland to guide the needles, it is often unable to visualize the prostate in enough detail to be able to see different lesions and areas of concern within it. Thus, many biopsy samples are taken systematically with two samples from each section of the prostate. Recently a new ultrasound machine has been created that gives images of the prostate with much higher resolution, allowing the radiologist performing the biopsy to see details within the prostate that were previously inaccessible. A study using this new high-resolution ultrasound machine is being completed at the Prostate Cancer Centre to compare the adequacy of this new machine to detect prostate cancer over the standard low-resolution machine. Over 650 patients will be enrolled in this study!

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