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Nanostics is an Official PlaidForDad Workplace!

Support PlaidForDad

Our workplace is participating in Plaid for Dad in support of Prostate Cancer Canada! Leading up to Father’s Day, let’s all wear plaid to work on Friday, June 14th to help raise funds and awareness for prostate cancer; all in the name of helping dads across Canada! Take a photo of your workplace colleagues dressed in Plaid on June 14th and send it to me (Perrin at pbeatty@ualberta.ca) and I will post it on the APCaRI blog!

Please make a donation and get involved. You can make a secure online donation now on our workplace campaign webpage using your credit card. Click here to go to the Team Nanostics donation page.

Also, take a couple of minutes to check out www.plaidfordad.ca, Hill Street Beverage Company, IndoChino, and Head/Penn (SportChek) if you like non-alcoholic beer, suits or tennis, respectively. These businesses will donate to PlaidForDad with the purchase of certain products!

Thanks – I’m looking forward to seeing you all in plaid on June 14th!

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Recent Posts

goes to...APCaRI member Russ Greiner Posted on Jun 15 21 at 7:51pm
Participation Milestone! Posted on May 29 21 at 6:12pm
Raja Singh Posted on Apr 30 21 at 12:24pm

Our First Participant!

Thanks to the participation from men with suspected prostate cancer and men diagnosed with prostate cancer, we will be able to measure if our “tests” can reveal the true nature of prostate cancer and if the tests or biomarkers can diagnose prostate cancer and tell us what cancers are more aggressive.

As part of the Alberta Prostate Registry and Biorepository, patients will be entered into our study, in which blood and other samples are collected over time and their health outcomes are recorded over many years. Patients will follow standard medical advice and care through their doctors. Our team collect biospecimens and information related to general health and cancer behavior over time.

Rather than being frightened by the word ‘cancer’, we want to learn how to predict serious and morbid prostate cancer complications well before they happen, so that we can weigh carefully the pros and cons of available treatments.

In the process, we expect to identify new and important advantage points for better therapies to be developed. The word “cancer” may be scary, but what is truly scary is unawareness.

“It makes me very happy to be able to contribute to find better ways to diagnose prostate cancer.”

- Mr. Garcia