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New platform for prostate cancer diagnosis to be presented at ISEV 2017

The Lewis Research Group will present exciting results about new blood tests for prostate cancer during 3 talks at the upcoming 2017 International Society of Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) annual meeting in Toronto (May 18-21). ISEV is a global society of researchers studying exosomes and microvesicles, which are the exciting new focus of cancer therapy and diagnosis.

Dr. Desmond Pink will speak about “Microflow cytometry: The Apogee A50 is a sensitive standard tool for extracellular vesicle analyses in liquid biopsies”, Robert Paproski’s presentation is entitled “Using machine learning of extracellular vesicle flow cytometry to build predictive fingerprints for prostate cancer diagnosis”, and Dr. John Lewis will speak about “An extracellular vesicle blood fingerprint distinguishes between patients with indolent and aggressive prostate cancer at diagnosis”.

The team is looking forward to sharing these key advances that were made possible through the APCaRI prospective cohort.

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Dr. Nawaid Usmani and team receive funding for their PRIME study!

The PRIME Study – Prevention and Intervention for MEtabolic syndrome:

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and newer manipulations of androgen receptor signaling have improved outcomes for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients.  The toxicities of ADT are many, including an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS; defined as at least 3 of: hyperglycemia; abdominal obesity; hypertriglyceridemia; reduced HDL cholesterol; and/or hypertension). MS is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease mortality, stroke mortality, and all-cause mortality.  The prevalence of MS in men receiving ADT is at least 50% and contributes to decreased quality of life and increased non-cancer-related mortality.  Metformin holds promise as a countermeasure to MS development, and also has been shown to suppress PCa growth in pre-clinical models.

We hypothesize that the addition of metformin to ADT will reduce the rates of MS in men with advanced PCa, diminishing important toxicities of a therapy universally used in advanced disease.

We propose a double-blind, randomized phase III study of metformin or placebo in men with PCa starting intermittent ADT. The primary endpoint is the difference in MS rates at 1 year.  Other aims include evaluation of the influence of metformin on: individual MS components at additional time points; mean serum insulin levels and measures of insulin resistance; weight and quality of life.

A finding that metformin reduces MS incidence and/or has other benefits would change practice, as it would provide a practical and inexpensive strategy to reduce toxicity of an intervention employed in most men with advanced PCa.

- Catalina Vasquez