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APCaRI members participate in the 2016 CCI Golf Classic

Members of the APCaRI team felt very fortunate yesterday to participate in the Alberta Cancer Foundation’s 28th Annual Cross Cancer Institute Golf Classic – a wonderful event that has raised more than $12 million to pioneer revolutionary projects in support of patients at Alberta’s own Cross Cancer Institute and beyond.

Over the past 27 years, the Cross Cancer Institute Golf Classic has funded leading edge research, treatment and patient care programs at the Cross Cancer Institute. In 2016, the Alberta Cancer Foundation embarked on a new investment that will bring together the brightest minds in colorectal cancer research to increase survival rates and improve quality of life for colorectal patients across the province.

Heartfelt thanks to the amazing volunteers, the organizing committee, the Alberta Cancer Foundation, and all of the participants!

 

 

 

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The Calgary Prostate Cancer Centre has the highest accrual for a novel ultrasound study in prostate cancer

“We have enrolled over 400 patients at our site, reaching our enrollment goal much faster than all other sites across North America. We are now planning on adding in 250 more patients to this trial because of the encouraging results found with the first arm of the trial. Our site tied with the highest accrual goal and surpassed all other sites to meet our enrollment goal.”

The study is a “Multi-Center trial of high-resolution transrectal ultrasound versus standard low-resolution transrectal ultrasound for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer”

The only definitive method for diagnosing prostate cancer is through a prostate biopsy. This procedure includes the use of an ultrasound machine to guide both freezing needles and biopsy needles into the prostate. The ultrasound machine that is currently in use is a low-resolution ultrasound machine which means that although it is good at seeing the entire prostate gland to guide the needles, it is often unable to visualize the prostate in enough detail to be able to see different lesions and areas of concern within it. Thus, many biopsy samples are taken systematically with two samples from each section of the prostate. Recently a new ultrasound machine has been created that gives images of the prostate with much higher resolution, allowing the radiologist performing the biopsy to see details within the prostate that were previously inaccessible. A study using this new high-resolution ultrasound machine is being completed at the Prostate Cancer Centre to compare the adequacy of this new machine to detect prostate cancer over the standard low-resolution machine. Over 650 patients will be enrolled in this study!

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- Eric Hyndman