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The Alberta Prostate Cancer Biorepository is certified by CTRNet

APCaRI is committed to collecting, processing and storing the samples you donate with the highest quality standards and as a result, after evaluation of our processes, the CTRNet (Canadian Tissue Repository Network) awarded us with their certification.

CTRNet is a translational cancer research resource, funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research, that furthers Canadian health research by linking cancer researchers with provincial tumour banks.

The benefits of working with CTRNet include:

  • The ability for researchers to search for quality controlled tissue samples from Canada’s leading tumour banks in one central location and for biobanks to display and make their biospecimens available for research users.
  • Learning opportunities in tissue handling, research design and relevant technology training and innovations.
  • Invitation to CTRNet workshops and conferences.

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Recent Posts

goes to...APCaRI member Russ Greiner Posted on Jun 15 21 at 7:51pm
Participation Milestone! Posted on May 29 21 at 6:12pm
Raja Singh Posted on Apr 30 21 at 12:24pm

Dr. Nawaid Usmani and team receive funding for their PRIME study!

The PRIME Study – Prevention and Intervention for MEtabolic syndrome:

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and newer manipulations of androgen receptor signaling have improved outcomes for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients.  The toxicities of ADT are many, including an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS; defined as at least 3 of: hyperglycemia; abdominal obesity; hypertriglyceridemia; reduced HDL cholesterol; and/or hypertension). MS is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease mortality, stroke mortality, and all-cause mortality.  The prevalence of MS in men receiving ADT is at least 50% and contributes to decreased quality of life and increased non-cancer-related mortality.  Metformin holds promise as a countermeasure to MS development, and also has been shown to suppress PCa growth in pre-clinical models.

We hypothesize that the addition of metformin to ADT will reduce the rates of MS in men with advanced PCa, diminishing important toxicities of a therapy universally used in advanced disease.

We propose a double-blind, randomized phase III study of metformin or placebo in men with PCa starting intermittent ADT. The primary endpoint is the difference in MS rates at 1 year.  Other aims include evaluation of the influence of metformin on: individual MS components at additional time points; mean serum insulin levels and measures of insulin resistance; weight and quality of life.

A finding that metformin reduces MS incidence and/or has other benefits would change practice, as it would provide a practical and inexpensive strategy to reduce toxicity of an intervention employed in most men with advanced PCa.

- Catalina Vasquez