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Prostate cancer ‘Rosetta stone’ paves way to new therapies

— almost 90% of metastatic prostate cancers have treatable defects —

A cancer genome sequencing study published last week in the prestigious journal Cell provides new and surprising information about metastatic prostate cancer that has become castration-resistant.

An international consortium of scientists pieced together the first comprehensive map of genetic mutations linked to metastatic prostate cancer from 150 patients and found that almost 90% of the men whose DNA they studied carried potentially treatable defects.

The findings suggest that these advanced cancers may be treated using a precision medicine approach, using a range of medicines that target specific gene mutations. Many of these medicines are already in use or undergoing clinical trials. They also learned that 8% of the men were born with genetic faults that predisposed them to prostate cancer, strengthening the case for screening people with a family history of the disease.

This research is groundbreaking because it provides solid evidence that there may be effective new treatment options for those with advanced prostate cancer who have become resistant to current therapies.

Click to read the original article abstract (you’ll need a subscription to read the entire manuscript).

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Russ Greiner’s Team “PC LEARN”, tied for 1st in the Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge

Competing with 50 teams from around the world in the Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge, University of Alberta’s PC LEARN team tied for 1st in one of the 3 sub-challenges
to predict the survival and toxicity of Docetaxel treatment in patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer!

“The DREAM Challenge was an exciting opportunity for us to apply machine learning to real medical data and possibly to contribute to medical research.” said lead PI and APCaRI member Russ Greiner.

The primary benefit of this Challenge will be to establish new quantitative benchmarks for prognostic modeling in mCRPC, with a potential impact for clinical decision making and ultimately understanding the mechanism of disease progression. https://www.synapse.org/#!Synapse:syn2813558/wiki/70844

- Russ Greiner