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Prostate cancer ‘Rosetta stone’ paves way to new therapies

— almost 90% of metastatic prostate cancers have treatable defects —

A cancer genome sequencing study published last week in the prestigious journal Cell provides new and surprising information about metastatic prostate cancer that has become castration-resistant.

An international consortium of scientists pieced together the first comprehensive map of genetic mutations linked to metastatic prostate cancer from 150 patients and found that almost 90% of the men whose DNA they studied carried potentially treatable defects.

The findings suggest that these advanced cancers may be treated using a precision medicine approach, using a range of medicines that target specific gene mutations. Many of these medicines are already in use or undergoing clinical trials. They also learned that 8% of the men were born with genetic faults that predisposed them to prostate cancer, strengthening the case for screening people with a family history of the disease.

This research is groundbreaking because it provides solid evidence that there may be effective new treatment options for those with advanced prostate cancer who have become resistant to current therapies.

Click to read the original article abstract (you’ll need a subscription to read the entire manuscript).

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New platform for prostate cancer diagnosis to be presented at ISEV 2017

The Lewis Research Group will present exciting results about new blood tests for prostate cancer during 3 talks at the upcoming 2017 International Society of Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) annual meeting in Toronto (May 18-21). ISEV is a global society of researchers studying exosomes and microvesicles, which are the exciting new focus of cancer therapy and diagnosis.

Dr. Desmond Pink will speak about “Microflow cytometry: The Apogee A50 is a sensitive standard tool for extracellular vesicle analyses in liquid biopsies”, Robert Paproski’s presentation is entitled “Using machine learning of extracellular vesicle flow cytometry to build predictive fingerprints for prostate cancer diagnosis”, and Dr. John Lewis will speak about “An extracellular vesicle blood fingerprint distinguishes between patients with indolent and aggressive prostate cancer at diagnosis”.

The team is looking forward to sharing these key advances that were made possible through the APCaRI prospective cohort.

- John Lewis