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Urinary outcomes are significantly affected by nerve sparing quality during radical prostatectomy

By:
Contributors: Eric Hyndman, MD, PhD

Urology. 2013 Dec;82(6):1348-53. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2013.06.067. Epub 2013 Oct 3.

Kaye DR1, Hyndman ME, Segal RL, Mettee LZ, Trock BJ, Feng Z, Su LM, Bivalacqua TJ, Pavlovich CP.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effect of nerve sparing (NS) quality on self-reported patient urinary outcomes after radical prostatectomy.

METHODS:

A total of 102 preoperatively potent men underwent laparoscopic or robotic radical prostatectomy; NS was prospectively graded at surgery using a 0-4 scale/neurovascular bundle. Urinary functional outcomes were measured by validated Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaire at baseline and follow-up time points (1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months) in 99 men who underwent various degrees of NS. Mixed linear regression was used to analyze the effect of NS quality and other clinical factors on urinary outcomes.

RESULTS:

Patients with at least 1 neurovascular bundle spared completely, along with its supportive tissues (NS grade 4/4), noted significantly improved Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite urinary functional and continence outcomes as early as 1 month postoperatively and up to 12 months. Significantly less urinary bother was also noted in these men by 9-12 months postoperatively. Multivariate analysis revealed that bilateral or unilateral excellent NS (at least 1 bundle graded 4/4), increasing time from surgery, young patient age, and lower body mass index positively and significantly affected urinary functional outcomes, including pad use. Men who received excellent unilateral NS recovered urinary function about as well as men who had both neurovascular bundles spared in similar fashion.

CONCLUSION:

The quality of NS significantly influences patient-defined urinary functional convalescence. Completely sparing at least 1 neurovascular bundle along with its supportive tissues has a dramatic effect on the recovery of urinary continence and quality of life in preoperatively potent men.

 

PubMed

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Dr. Nawaid Usmani and team receive funding for their PRIME study!

The PRIME Study – Prevention and Intervention for MEtabolic syndrome:

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and newer manipulations of androgen receptor signaling have improved outcomes for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients.  The toxicities of ADT are many, including an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS; defined as at least 3 of: hyperglycemia; abdominal obesity; hypertriglyceridemia; reduced HDL cholesterol; and/or hypertension). MS is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease mortality, stroke mortality, and all-cause mortality.  The prevalence of MS in men receiving ADT is at least 50% and contributes to decreased quality of life and increased non-cancer-related mortality.  Metformin holds promise as a countermeasure to MS development, and also has been shown to suppress PCa growth in pre-clinical models.

We hypothesize that the addition of metformin to ADT will reduce the rates of MS in men with advanced PCa, diminishing important toxicities of a therapy universally used in advanced disease.

We propose a double-blind, randomized phase III study of metformin or placebo in men with PCa starting intermittent ADT. The primary endpoint is the difference in MS rates at 1 year.  Other aims include evaluation of the influence of metformin on: individual MS components at additional time points; mean serum insulin levels and measures of insulin resistance; weight and quality of life.

A finding that metformin reduces MS incidence and/or has other benefits would change practice, as it would provide a practical and inexpensive strategy to reduce toxicity of an intervention employed in most men with advanced PCa.

- Catalina Vasquez