Publications

Prostate Cancer after Initial High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Benign Prostate Biopsy

Can J Urol. 2015 Dec;22(6):8056-62.

Patel P, Nayak JG, Biljetina Z, Donnelly B, Trpkov K.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Limited data exist on long term pathological outcomes in patients with initial prostate biopsies showing either high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) or benign findings, who are subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Preoperative characteristics of patients showing either HGPIN or benign initial prostate biopsies were investigated and compared in patients with and without a subsequent diagnosis of prostate cancer. We also compared the biopsy and prostatectomy findings in patients with prostate cancer in both groups.

RESULTS:

We evaluated 161 and 85 patients with initial HGPIN and benign prostate biopsies, respectively, who underwent a subsequent biopsy. After a median follow up of 11 years, prostate cancer was detected in 26.7% patients after HGPIN and in 22.3% patients after initial benign biopsy. Ninety-eight percent of positive biopsies after initial HGPIN demonstrated either Gleason score (GS) 3 + 3 (86%) or GS 3 + 4 (12%). In the benign group, 100% of patients demonstrated prostate cancer on biopsy with either GS 3 + 3 (58%) or GS 3 + 4 (42%). Of 35 patients who underwent prostatectomy (22 after initial HGPIN biopsy and 13 after initial benign biopsy), all had node negative, organ-confined disease; 86% and 54% patients had GS6 disease, with = 5% tumor volume found in 91% and 62% of the HGPIN and benign group, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with initial HGPIN or benign biopsies preceding a diagnosis of prostate cancer usually show favourable pathology on positive biopsy and prostatectomy, most commonly exhibiting low volume and low grade disease. These findings may help clinicians risk-stratify patients who may benefit from conservative management options.

PubMed

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Post-Doctoral Fellow Dr. Lian Willetts shines light on the frontiers of discovery

Dr. Lian Willetts was awarded 2nd place in the Falling Walls Lab Finale in Berlin representing Dr. John Lewis’ lab by presenting: “Breaking the Walls of Prostate Cancer Metastasis”

Lab Falling Walls is an international competition that challenges graduate students to showcase how their research is redefining their respective fields and breaking down the walls to the next major scientific breakthrough. The University of Alberta is one of 20 approved international events, and the Sept. 30 event saw 16 outstanding examples of graduate research. Dr. Willetts was awarded 1st place during this night.

International Labs and the Finale in Berlin

Falling Walls Lab is a global scale event that takes place in different vibrant cities around the world throughout the year. The Falling Walls Lab Finale is held each year in Berlin on 8 November. The Finale gathers 100 participants, among them all winners of the international Labs.

- Catalina Vasquez