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APCaRI Fall Symposium 2015 “Knowledge, Action, Impact”

On October 23 and 24, 2015, APCaRI will celebrate its 5th research meeting at the Delta Lodge at Kananaskis, Alberta.

More than 50 participants including clinicians, scientists, clinical research personnel, trainees, benefactors and representatives of PCa support groups will participate in this fun and enriching event.

The team will benefit from the insight and experience that will be shared by the 2 keynote speakers: William B Isaacs, Ph.D., Depts. of Urology and Oncology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. “Is there a genetic basis for Prostate Cancer Progression?” and Nicole F. Steinmetz, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. “From pathogen to cure: engineering plant virus-based Nanotechnologies for imaging and therapy”

In addition, we will have 4 talks from senior scientists Drs. Frank Wuest (Dept Oncology, U of A), Len Luyt (Chemistry Department, U of A), Christopher Cairo (Depts. of Science & Chemistry, U of A), Andries Zijlstra (Dept. of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University) and John Lewis (Dept Oncology, U of A) and 14 short talks from trainees from different institutions in the province along with a poster session.

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Agenda APCaRI Fall Symposium 2015 “Knowledge, Action, Impact”

Generously supported by the Bird Dogs and the Alberta Cancer Foundation

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Our First Participant!

Thanks to the participation from men with suspected prostate cancer and men diagnosed with prostate cancer, we will be able to measure if our “tests” can reveal the true nature of prostate cancer and if the tests or biomarkers can diagnose prostate cancer and tell us what cancers are more aggressive.

As part of the Alberta Prostate Registry and Biorepository, patients will be entered into our study, in which blood and other samples are collected over time and their health outcomes are recorded over many years. Patients will follow standard medical advice and care through their doctors. Our team collect biospecimens and information related to general health and cancer behavior over time.

Rather than being frightened by the word ‘cancer’, we want to learn how to predict serious and morbid prostate cancer complications well before they happen, so that we can weigh carefully the pros and cons of available treatments.

In the process, we expect to identify new and important advantage points for better therapies to be developed. The word “cancer” may be scary, but what is truly scary is unawareness.

“It makes me very happy to be able to contribute to find better ways to diagnose prostate cancer.”

- Mr. Garcia